Coco Peat vs Coco Coir: What's the Difference?

May 11, 2022

Coco Peat vs Coco Coir: What's the Difference?

There are many different types of substrates or growing mediums to choose from when it comes to growing plants. Two of the most popular choices are coco peat and coco coir.

Coco peat and coco coir are both excellent substrates for plants. But before you can decide which one is right for you, it's essential to understand the difference between them.

This blog post will discuss the differences between coco peat and coco coir and help you decide which one is right for you!

What Is Coco Peat?

Coco peat is made from the husks of coconuts. It's a byproduct of the coconut industry and is usually used as a growing medium or substrate for plants. Coco peat is very versatile and can be used in various ways.

It can be used as a potting mix, added to soil to improve drainage, or even used on its own as a hydroponic growing medium. Coco peat is also famous because it's environmentally friendly and sustainable.

Related: How to Use Coco Peat to Grow Plants and for Seed Germination?

What Is Coco Coir?

On the other hand, Coco coir is made from the fibers of coconuts. It's another byproduct of the coconut industry, and like coco peat, it's very versatile. Coco coir can be used as a potting mix, added to soil, or used on its own as a hydroponic growing medium.

Coco coir is also environmentally friendly and sustainable. However, one of the most significant benefits of coco coir is that it's less likely to compact than other substrates like peat moss. This means that your plants will have better drainage and aeration.

Related: How to Grow Hydroponic Plants with Coco Coir?

How Are Coco Peat and Coco Coir Different from Each Other?

  • Raw material: Coco peat is made from the husks of coconuts, while coco coir is made from the fibers of coconuts.
  • Drainage and aeration: Coco peat is more absorbent than coco coir and holds more water, making it better for plants that need more water. Coco coir is beneficial as it has better drainage and aeration properties.
  • Cation Exchange capacity: Coco coir is more resistant to mold and has a higher cation exchange capacity, making it better for plants that need more nutrients.
  • Texture: Coco peat is light and fluffy, while coco coir is coarse and fibrous.
  • Color: Coco peat is usually white or light brown, while coco coir is brown or reddish-brown.
  • pH levels: Coco peat is neutral, while coco coir is slightly acidic.

Coco peat vs Coco coir

How Is Coco Peat and Coco Coir Similar to Each Other?

  • Both are a byproduct of the coconut industry.
  • Both are versatile and can be used in various ways, such as a potting mix, added to soil to improve drainage, or even used on their own as a hydroponic growing medium.
  • Both are popular because it's environmentally friendly and sustainable
  • Unlike other plant materials, coco coir and coco peat will not decompose and maintain their structural integrity for years.
  • Both Coco coir and Coco peat can be used as a soil amendment, an erosion control agent, or a growing medium for plants. It is also high in carbon, making it an excellent choice for composting.
  • Both can be used as mulch.

How to Make Coco Peat at Home Step by Step from Raw Coconut?

Follow the steps and instructions provided below

  • To make coco peat and coco coir, you will need:
  • - A sharp knife
  • - A cheese grater
  • - A blender or food processor
  • - A strainer
  • - A bucket or container to hold the finished product
  • Collect coconuts from a local grocery store or farmer's market. Make sure to get unsweetened coconuts, as the sweetened variety will produce a syrup that is difficult to remove.
  • Remove the meat from the coconuts and set it aside for another use.

Instructions to make coco peat at home:

  • Grate the coconut husks into small pieces using a cheese grater.
  • If you use a blender or food processor, you can cut the husks into smaller pieces before adding them to the machine. Blend or process the husks until broken down into a fibrous pulp.
  • Strain the pulp through a strainer to remove any large pieces. The finished product should be a light, fluffy material that resembles peat moss. Store the coco peat in a bucket or container until you are ready to use it.
  • Making the coco peat without machine blending will make it more difficult to remove the husks from the finished product. However, this method will produce higher-quality coco peat that is less likely to compact.
Related: 5 Disadvantages of Coco Peat: What You Need to Know

Instructions to make coco coir at home:

  • The fiber is separated from the rest of the coconut and then dried. Coco coir is easy to make and has many uses, including as a soil amendment and mulch.

Coco Peat vs. Coco Coir: Which One Is Right for You?

If you're looking for a substrate that offers better drainage and aeration, coco coir would be the better choice. If you're looking for an environmentally friendly and sustainable substrate, either coco peat or coco coir would be a good choice.

Ultimately, it's up to you to decide which substrate is suitable for your plants! It depends on your needs and preferences.

Thank you for reading!

Also, read: Rockwool vs Coco Coir: Which Is the Right Choice for You?

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Click here if you are looking for Coco peat, Coco peat coins or Coco coir for your garden.

Pros & Cons of Coco peat as Hyd...
Pros & Cons of Coco peat as Hydroponic Growing Medium

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